Going down south

Going down south

I turn over another page. My cup of coffee is as good as empty and I strongly consider getting another one. On my right, an old woman with short grey hair and a raincoat as orange as the morning sun is steadily working her way through hers. She’s reading too. Perhaps I am studying her just a moment too long, for she slightly turns her head towards me and I quickly have to adjust my gaze so it seems like I’m staring out of the window behind her. She smiles, takes a last nip of her drink and leaves not long thereafter. I’m in a coffee place in Nyköping and I just came back from a small trip to the south, comprising the cities of Lund, Malmö and Copenhagen. Like my coffee, my energy-level needs a påfyll too.

Copenhagen’s Rådhuspladsen

Copenhagen’s Rådhuspladsen

The trip itself was – although tightly and last-minute planned – great. As some friends hosted us each for a night or two, we travelled around quite a bit by train. This was by no means an obstacle, even the five hour journey from Stockholm to Lund turned out very comfortable! An added bonus was that I could cross the famous, or – if you’re also a fan of the crime series Bron – infamous Øresundsbridge connecting Denmark and Sweden three times. Some highlights and afterthoughts of the trip:

The Øresundsbridge seen from Malmö

The Øresundsbridge seen from Malmö

  • Lund is a very small, but cosy city with a lot of churches and castles. The Cathedral, including some large medieval clockwork, is definitely a must-see. Apart from that, the university makes up a large part of the scenic city. Oh, and Café Landgren does nice coffee-breakfasts where you can sit down and taste various kinds.
  • Malmö gives off a very different vibe than Lund; it’s a harbour city and besides bigger much more industrial too. Unfortunately I have not seen lots of Sweden’s third hotspot: I was there for half a day only and it was raining. The Turning Torso is worth checking out and you can visit plenty of museums with one combined ticket.
  • Copenhagen was the main destination of the trip and I couldn’t stop comparing it to Amsterdam all the time. It felt like coming home in a city I had never visited before: the architecture, the many bikers, cheaper food ;-). And Danish I find a really beautiful language! I know most people – especially Swedes – will raise their eyebrows right now but I find it fascinating how you can hear Swedish, German and even Dutch influences all in one tongue. Absolute must-sees include of course the Little Mermaid and Nyhavn. The Royal Library is called Black Diamond and if you stand in front of it, you will know why. Paludan is a heavenly combination of a café and library. Tivoli (Copenhagen’s Gröna Lund) looked pretty as well but we didn’t go in.
Colourful houses in Nyhavn

Colourful houses in Nyhavn!

 

And what has happened up here in Stockholm? Frankly, nothing exceptional. My daily rhythm starts to follow the sun more and more, meaning that I try to be outside during daylight as much as possible. I really enjoy hiking in nature and I think it is an absolute privilege to have so much ‘green’ around in a capital city. Lately, I hiked for two and a half hours and I discovered lots of new places! At one of them I found this chalkboard where you can answer the question Vad tanker du på? (What are you thinking about?). Without revealing anything, it was heart-warming – and sometimes very… interesting – to see what people have written.

What are you thinking about sign

What are you thinking about?

Apart from that, I have been watching a lot of films :-). More so, my course which taught in Swedish is going even better than I expected. It seems that there are only good tidings to bring! Ah, Christmas ;-). The city is making its preparations already with a Christmas market and an ice-skating area at Kungsträdgården. Time goes by so fast; I don’t even want to think of going home!

P.S.

I can’t ice-skate.

I can’t ice-skate.